Action Sports Maui Gallery

Action Sports Maui Gallery

December on Maui

Winter Solstice December 21st.

December is the wettest month in Hawaii, which is great as most of the islands have been in drought for a long time, this gives our aquifers a chance to recharge, and many parts of our island get to go green again.

December is also a time of winter waves and swell. Maui gets its biggest waves in the winter and hosts several big wave surfing contests. In December you might also catch a glimpse of some island snow on the volcanoes of the Big Island, or you might even see some Snow atop Haleakala here on Maui. December is also whale season so there are all types of whale watching tours, and submarine tours run all year round.

Although it is Winter the ocean temperatures are on average 77 degrees, so swimming and surfing are pleasant, although the early morning air temperatures may dip into the 60’s, so you might need a sweat-shirt. As always there are many different microclimates around Maui, and you can usually find cooler weather upcountry, or warmer weather at the coast, rain on the windward side, and sun on the leeward shores. Hiking is not recommended during rainy spells, but instead, you can visit the winery or tour around sightseeing.

Some activities will be postponed in the rain while others are not affected by it. So check with your activity providers to help you plan your activities to take into account the weather forecast. Some rain showers will only last a few minutes or an hour, while some may persist longer. Remember that you might be stuck in a rain cloud in Hana for a week while the rest of the island is sunny, so be prepared to move around to find the best conditions. Having said that, beware of flash floods. Never attempt to cross water flowing over roadways by foot or by car. If necessary you may need to wait an hour or two for a safe time to cross. Take care swimming on beaches with big shore-break, and always try to only swim at lifeguarded beaches for maximum safety.

 

Rainy day Activities:

  • Surfing (light rain usually ok).
  • Kiteboarding (light rain usually ok).
  • Whale-watching tours.
  • Atlantis Submarine.
  • Road to Hana (but not during flash flood watch).
  • The Sugar Museum.
  • Bailey House Museum.
  • Front Street Lahaina.
  • Art Galleries.
  • Craft Galleries.
  • Maui Ocean Center Aquarium.
  • Restaurants. Maui tropical Plantation, Millhouse.
  • Cruise Surf Shops.
  • Surfing History Museum (closed).
  • Watch the Surfers at Hookipa/Honolua/Jaws.
  • Go to the Gym.
  • Go to the Spa.
  • Get a Massage, out-call or in-call.
  • Read a book. Go to the library.
  • Watch a Movie at the theater.
  • Go see a Show.
  • Get a Manicure Pedicure.
  • Whalers Village Museum.
  • Baldwin Home Museum (Lahaina).
  • Souvenir Shopping.
  • Kihei Kalama Village.
  • See a Magic Show (Warren & Annabelle’s).
  • Visit the Humane Society.

December Rainbows

Kite Trips Maui

Discover the exciting world of Maui kiteboarding:  We host Kite trips to Maui for all levels of Kiters and non-kiting family members. If you want to Kite every day in great conditions or mix Kiting with some sightseeing and cultural activities we have a plan to suit you. Each Kite Trip is customized to your needs and budget. We can arrange everything so you can relax and enjoy the experience. Maui is known as one of the most reliable and best kiteboarding locations on the planet, with warm side shore winds and accessible ocean and a range of conditions to suit every rider.

Kiting Activities Include:  Available options include, Go free riding anytime, we tell you where to go, and we have give you daily weather updates.  Or join one of our; Advanced riding sessions, Supervised kiting for intermediates, Down winders, Get some Coaching, Get a Kite-Caddy, as well as Kiting lessons for every level. Try Something new, Ocean Riding, Directional Boards, Learn to Foilboard, or push your kiting to new levels with private coaching. We say a week in Maui is like a month on the mainland, your riding will improve and you will expand your kiting experience.

Non-Kiters may want to get a taste of Kiting: We have a full-service Kite School offering a single “Try Kiting” lessons, and multi-day courses too. Maui is a great place to try kiting for the first time.

Maui is an adventure sports playground: In addition to some of the world’s best Kiteboarding and Windsurfing, Maui also offers, Volcano Tours, Downhill Mountain Biking, Surfing, Rain-forest Tours, Scuba Adventures. Underwater Scooter tour of shipwrecks, and full dry submarine tours. On Maui, it is “Summer” year round, but the biggest surfing waves are in the winter and the best wind is in summer. Many people like to come Spring and fall for a combination of wind and waves too.

Local Lifestyle: Singles can travel solo, or get together with other kiters in private or shared accommodation, whatever your preference. We have regular group activities at Maui’s best attractions and locations. You can have fun and socialize with international travelers and the locals too. Live in the moment and be spontaneous or let us plan your daily schedule, it is up to you. We can guarantee that you will always have the best options and choices available to you.

 

Family Experience: Traveling with family is no problem too, we understand that you always cannot Kite 24/7 but you can maximize your ride-time, while catering to all the non-kiters in your crew.

 Families can enjoy Maui too, with Shared Ride time, alternate activities, and we even have qualified Child Care available on the beach. Young Kids can also participate in Surfing from age 5 and up, windsurfing, from age 6 and “Kid’s” Kiting from age 8 and up.

 

Maui Climate: Maui is situated 20 degrees north of the equator and square in the trade wind latitude. Maui has warm weather year round, and has kiteboarding all year long. The peak windy season is in summer, and the peak wave season is in winter. Surfing is also available all year as well as all ocean activities. There are really only two seasons in Hawaii: summer (kau) from May to October and winter (hooilo) from November to April. The average daytime summer temperature at sea level is 85° F (29.4° C), while the average daytime winter temperature is 78° (25.6° C).

Maui Culture: Maui Has a unique host culture, the Hawaiian culture is a Polynesian culture that was centered around the aquatic lifestyle as well as being in tune with the natural world, and practicing ecologically responsible agriculture. Sports have always been an integral part of Hawaiian society and surfing especially achieved a high art form and a spiritual-religious standing. Sailing, seafaring, surfing, canoe racing, are part of the community culture. In Hawaii, you can experience some of the Hawaiian culture in various activities, tours, as well as specialty events.

Your Hosts: We have been hosting Kite Trips for over 20 years and can cater to almost every need. Budget accommodation up to private oceanfront homes, or 5-star resorts are available for the asking. Or you may prefer to live like a local, and enjoy the Island. We are also the source of your Kiting windsurf, and Surfing lessons, gear rentals and on-water activities.

Dare to Dream: All great adventures start with a simple idea and a dream. Dare to dream yourself kiting on Maui, and your adventure has already begun.

Plan your Trip: The peak windy Season on Maui is May through September, with the most reliable wind and easiest conditions. And this is a great time to plan your kite trip. Send us your dates, group size, and activity preferences, and we can put together a great itinerary package for you.

Aloha, AK.

 

 

Maui Weather Blog Today

** These predictions are for the generalized (Tradewind) airflow across the state, and localized mechanical wind effects (trees etc), and intermittent variables (rain/venturi/clouds/etc.) also need to be considered. 

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CAUTION: Always be sure of your abilities, training, and local knowledge before you attempt to kite, sail or surf. If in doubt don't go out!

Today’s Wind Forecast – Model Tables:

Wind Yesterday:  Here is yesterday’s wind graph for Kanaha.

Weather Map: Global weather patterns affect our local weather. Distant storms produce surf, and massive pressure systems create our winds. We can see these features on the Weather Map. Here is today’s weather map:


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Tides on Maui: In general Tides only vary about 2 feet in range, While this is a small amount it makes a big difference because the water is shallow in many places and the reef can get close to the surface or exposed at low tides. At high tides, beaches become narrow and will have more shore-break. Pay attention to the tide times for a better safer session. For more detailed information about tides go to our Maui Tides Page. Here are today’s Tides below.

Rain Radar: The rain radar is the best way to see if there is bad weather coming especially heavy rains. Rain showers are not only wet, they can cause flooding on land, and rain squalls can cause strong wind gusts. Severe storms may create lightning as well. So it is always prudent to pay attention to the rain radar. Click here for the Current Radar Image (static image of Dopler Radar): 

Changing of the Seasons: Maui has super consistent weather, but we still have seasons here. The Surfing Season is coming and you will notice things changing. Each season has a character a and a rhythm, so be prepared to adjust your approach and technique accordingly. To read more about the different weather by season and by month, Go to our Maui Weather Page..

Oceans are not like Lakes or Rivers: If you are new to ocean sailing then you should get a lesson on Ocean Sailing from one of our Action Sports Maui instructors. There are many common pitfalls and basic survival techniques that you will want to learn before getting yourself into trouble. Talk to Suzie about our “Ocean Rider 101 class”. Read more about ocean safety on our Ocean Safety Page..

Strong Wind Warning: Maui has a lot more strong wind days than most other locations. Many people have not kited in strong winds before. Riding in strong winds requires an adapted technique and specialty equipment. If you came to Maui with only large kite sizes then there is a good chance that your kite will be too big some of the time. Do not go out overpowered, you are taking a risk with your own safety but you put other people at risk as well. So always ask one of our local instructors about you kite size choice if you are in any doubt. Your kite should never be significantly larger than the other kites on the water. Note that most of the local riders will make better-informed choices on right kite size for the local conditions. If necessary you will need to rent a smaller kite And/or get a lesson on riding a smaller kite in strong winds. If you have never ridden a small kite size before, then get a lesson from one of our Instructors. Ask Suzie about our High-Wind 101 Lesson. For an overview of the lessons we offer go to our Lesson Overview Slider Here.
Hurricane Season:  Hurricanes are most likely to occur July through December in Hawaii. Hurricanes bring severe bad weather, flooding rain and potentially devastatingly strong winds. The passing of a Hurricane may last days or up to a week or more. The Hurricanes usually develop far away in the eastern Pacific and we generally get several days or more warning of their approach. So there is usually time to make preparations and even evacuate if necessary. Many Hurricanes come close to Hawaii but are just too far away to have a severe effect, This near-miss scenario, and repeated canceled warnings, can give some people a false sense of security. Until one does hit, and then they may be unprepared. Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

Tsunami Wave HawaiiTsunami Waves:  The Hawaiian Islands are susceptible to tsunamis. Tsunamis are a series of large devastating waves caused by geological events, like earthquakes and undersea landslides. In the event of an undersea earthquake, large sections of seafloor can suddenly shift causing a huge displacement of water. Unlike regular waves that are an accumulation of smaller wind waves. Tsunamis are much larger and will breach the shoreline and inundate the land. For updated info on Tsunamis go to The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

Climate Change Maui: There is a lot of confusion about climate change. There are anthropogenic (man-made) factors that affect climate, like greenhouse gases, deforestation, and pollution. This is a worldwide problem but has to be managed locally as well. Reducing our carbon footprint using renewable resources like solar and wind energy, as well as recycling and reusing materials rather than throwing materials away after a single use. Also being mindful of not causing harm to the ecosystem by overusing toxic agricultural chemicals. Also eating less meat (reduces greenhouse gases and deforestation) and would be a major step in slowing Global Warming.  For More Information, including  How climate change affects Maui, Beach Loss, & Coral Reef Destruction and Degradation, Go to Our Climate Change Maui page

CAUTION: Always be sure of your abilities, training, and local knowledge before you attempt to kite, sail or surf. If in doubt don’t go out!  

Maui Factor: Maui is not like other places. Maui is perhaps more extreme than most people are expecting. Always treat Nature and the elements here with respect. Be humble and do not underestimate the weather. Mother Nature is the boss, so do not push your luck no matter how long you have waited to sail or surf here. There are going to be days when you should NOT go out. There will always be conditions too tough even for the biggest expert, never forget that. Maui factor usually also means that you will not be as good as you think you are, the first time you ride here. So start out conservatively and take the time to learn about local conditions. Pay your dues, be respectful, and be prepared to be humbled. With the right attitude and approach, you will better appreciate, adapt to, and ultimately enjoy the uniqueness that Maui has to offer. **Read More Local Information Below at the Bottom of this Page.

KITE SAFE PRO-TIPS:  “BEWARE OF OFFSHORE WIND” 

Offshore wind is inherently dangerous: Never kite in off-shore wind if you have no way to return to shore. For Safety, you always need to be able to drift downwind to a point on land. Offshore winds in a bay:  a small bay that is offshore at the launch, but has another shore with onshore wind, that can be easily reached by downwind body dragging is sometimes acceptable. Never ride in pure offshore winds without a dedicated support boat active on site. Launching in offshore winds is very difficult as winds are usually very gusty. Offshore winds are deceptive; the wind at the shore is usually very different from the wind on the water. People often severely underestimate the wind strength in offshore winds. When you launch/ride in offshore winds there is a greater difficulty returning to the beach afterward. Getting back to the beach may become impossible!  For More Kite Safety Tips Go To Kitesafe.com

Have a plan before you launchHave  Plan Before you Launch: Always consider what will happen when your gear breaks, or you lose your board or kite. What is your plan when gear failure happens? What is your plan when the wind increases/decreases? What is your plan when there is no one to assist you. What is your plan when you get tired/cold/injured?  If you do not have a plan, or if you do not know the answers to these basic questions, then we strongly suggest that you get a lesson from one of our local instructors to give you the skills to become self-sufficient, independent and able to kite responsibly and “autonomously” in the local Maui Conditions.

Shorebreak Warning: Watch out for shore break. There is a high risk of serious injury or death. Especially when the tide is high and the swell is up. There tends to be more shore break. Shore break is waves breaking into the shoreline, and they can be especially dangerous even when they are small. Take care when crossing through the shore break, and do not linger there. Get in and get out quickly, do not lose your footing, and definitely, do not drop your kite in the shore break. For More Infor on ShoreBreaks go to our Shore Break Warning Page.  

Maui Surf ReportMaui Surf Report: The Maui Surf Report has far too much information to fit here so it has its very own page. So if you need the latest surf info, like to learn, or are just curious then please check it out. For more detailed Surf Information go to our Maui Surf Report Page.  

Maui Wind Report: The Maui Wind Report has far too much information to fit here so it has its very own page. So if you need all the detailed Maui Wind Info, like to learn, or are just curious then please check it out. For more detailed wind information go to our Maui Wind Report Page.  

Find Us on Kite Beach: We are at Kitebeach almost every day (10 am – 5 pm), so come look for our Van, and Drop By and Say hello. *Ask us for a copy of the New MKC Guidelines for Kiting on Maui Brochure that includes a map of Maui kite spots. Call in for Lessons Schedule and Information, we are on for lessons, today, and we are getting busy, please call us if you want to schedule a lesson. +1 (808) 283-7913

Loss of Beach Access: A most pressing made-made issue is Loss of Beach Access, where less public ocean access is available. This is due to developers, and public planners failing to protect ocean access points. Developers, shady land swaps, county apathy, politics, and power. This is the biggest immediate threat the ocean users face here on Maui.  Ocean access in Hawaii is being lost all of the time, we all need to stay vigilant and get informed, and speak out against it. And when necessary buy back the beach! If you ignore your ability to access the beach, then it will go away! For More Information go to Maui Kiteboarding Association Save Kanaha Page or Go directly to the Change.org Save Kanaha Petition

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For the Older Weather Blogs Click Here

Maui is the Adventure Sports Capital

Maui is the Adventure Sports Capital: Other islands have their highlights, Big island has great Diving, Kauai has great hiking, and Oahu has its famous surfing. But only Maui has all of these sports and More. Maui’s natural elements are a water-sports paradise with accessible ocean, waves, wind, and warm water. Maui’s Leeward shores are great for relaxing, swimming, snorkeling, and diving, SUP and learning to surf. And the windward shores have the more extreme conditions for the serious watersports men, Kiteboarding, Windsurf, Big Surf, and advanced SUP, Prone paddling, and more.  But it doesn’t stop there, Maui also has land based adventure sports like Downhill Biking, Hiking, Zip-lines, Paragliding, even ATVs, and Rappelling. There are also many other Exciting Adventures that are not strictly “sports” but adrenaline pumping activities nonetheless like; Helicopter rides, Harley Rides, Ultralight flights, Cave tours, Submarine Rides, Parasailing, Jetskiing, and more. There are also some less extreme activities for the rest of the family to enjoy like, Guided Hikes, Hana Tours, Farm Tours, Goat Farm, Waterfalls, Exploring, Snorkeling, Swimming, Bicycle rides, Segways, Electric bikes, Skateboard parks, Rollerblading, boat tours, sailing trips, the Maui Aquarium, scenic drives, and Haleakala sunrises.

for more information on Activities to Do on Maui go here.

Shore Break Warning

Shorebreak Warning: Watch out for shore break. Especially when the tide is high and the swell is up. There tends to be more shore break. Shore break is waves breaking into the shoreline, and they can be especially dangerous even when they are small. Take care when crossing through the shore break, and do not linger there. Get in and get out quickly, do not lose your footing, and definitely do not drop your kite in the shore break. Also, watch out for logs and debris in the shore-break, even rocks can get thrown around and hit you. Your board too can become a projectile if it gets caught in the shore-break. If you do drop a kite or board in the shore-break, be very careful trying to retrieve it. Don’t get caught in-between the object and the shoreline when there is a wave behind it, or it will run you over. people can get pinned under their kites or sails when the wave piles water on top of it. Note: Don’t be holding onto any kite lines as a wave hits the kite because the sudden force will cause it to wrench out of your hands too. Moving water contains a lot of energy, so make sure that you do not get in-between the moving water (wave) and the shoreline. the other danger with shore-break is getting flipped over and dumped on your head. This is super common because you will have no traction on the sea floor once you become buoyed up in the water. Key Point Recap: Shore-break is dangerous, Shore-break happens at high tide during a big swell. Do not linger in the shore-break zone. Don’t drop kite or board in shore-break. Logs, rocks, and boards can become projectiles in shore-break. Objects like kites and sails are almost impossible to hold onto in the shore break and become dangerous. Never hold onto kite lines in the shore-break. There is a high risk of getting flipped over onto your head and injured.

For More Kite Safety Tips Go To Kitesafe.com

Climate Change Maui

Climate Change Maui: There is a lot of confusion about climate change. There are anthropogenic (man-made) factors that affect climate, like greenhouse gasses, deforestation, and pollution. This is a worldwide problem but has to be managed locally as well. Reducing our carbon footprint using renewable resources like solar and wind energy, as well as recycling and reusing materials rather than throwing materials away after a single use. Also being mindful of not causing harm to the ecosystem by over using toxic agricultural chemicals. Also eating less meat (reduces greenhouse gasses and deforestation) and would be a major step in slowing Global Warming

How climate change affects Maui, we are an island so sea level rise is a problem, There is forecast sea level rise globally with an average of 1.8mm per year. Kahului Maui has a forecast annual sea level rise of 2.1mm per year. which is very small annually by adds up over the longer timescale. Here is an inundation map (below) of Kahului after the 1-meter sea level rise. At current rates, this is estimated to be in approximately 500 years. As you can see Kite beach is still there. The negative effects of climate change should not be underestimated. Severe weather and crop failures will have a dramatic effect on the way we live, Storm damage to property and the relocation and reinforcing of infrastructure will be very disruptive and extremely expensive.

BEACH LOSS: Beach Loss is not solely attributed to sea level rise, it is more directly influenced by man-made problems like destruction of wetlands, destruction of sand stocks, covering shoreline dunes with development, 70 years of sand mining (removal of sand and coral from beaches and nearshore waters), and shoreline hardening. These are things that we can more easily remedy (/ remediate), at least in the short-term. Beach restoration, sand supplementation, Dune stabilization with native plants, sand fencing, limiting overuse of the nearshore zone, and of course shoreline setback regulations for new structures being constructed. Shoreline areas need to be preserved for their vital role in protecting our island from shoreline retreat. Beach loss/sand-loss itself is just the symptom of the underlying problems.

Coral Reef Destruction and Degradation: Coral Reef Protects the shoreline from wave action and allows the build up of sandy beaches. Coral Reefs also provide the raw materials for Coral Sands that most Maui beaches are primarily made of. Healthy Coral needs to be protected and appreciated and valued for its role in coastal protection and beach preservation.

 

Image from Maui Beach Management Plan. Official estimates for sea level rise (annual 2.1mm) put this “1-meter inundation model scenario” at about 500 years in the future.

 

Hurricanes in Hawaii

What is a hurricane? 

A hurricane is a type of storm called a tropical cyclone, which forms over tropical or subtropical waters. … Tropical cyclones with maximum sustained surface winds of less than 39 miles per hour (mph) are called tropical depressions.Jul 5, 2017
https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/hurricane.html
 
Hurricane Formation: Hurricanes form over warm water. Hurricanes start out as storms and keep gaining their energy from warm water. Hurricanes will lose energy when they travel over colder water or land. Hurricanes carry strong winds and heavy rains, which can be a deadly combination.
 
Hurricane Warning: An announcement that hurricane conditions are expected within the specified area. Because outside preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, warnings are issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Hurricane Season:  Hurricanes are most likely to occur July through December in Hawaii. Hurricanes bring severe bad weather, flooding rain and potentially devastatingly strong winds. The passing of a Hurricane may last days or up to a week or more. The Hurricanes usually develop far away in the eastern Pacific and we generally get several days or more warning of their approach. So there is usually time to make preparations and even evacuate if necessary. Many Hurricanes come close to Hawaii but are just too far away to have a severe effect, This near-miss scenario, and repeated canceled warnings, can give some people a false sense of security. Until one does hit, and they may be unprepared. Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/storm_graphics/EP06/refresh/EP062017_5day_cone_no_line_and_wind+png/024105_5day_cone_no_line_and_wind.png

 

This is a computer generated “Forcast Model” of Hurricane Fernanda 2017, seven days in the future.

 

This next image shows the interactive map, that shows the probable path and Cone of Concern for Hurricane Fernanda: